logo-small

Facebook

Copyright 2019 Oliverson & Huss, PLLC.
All Rights Reserved.

24/7 365 Days

Attorney is Available Now.

480.616.8229

Call Us for a Free Consultation

Facebook

Search
Menu

ARIZONA ASSAULT ATTORNEY

Under A.R.S. 13-1203, Assault occurs when a person either intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly causes any physical injury to another person; knowingly touches another person with the intent to injure, insult or provoke; or intentionally places another person in reasonable apprehension of imminent physical injury.

 

Under Arizona law, any type of injury, no matter how minor, can qualify as an injury to prove assault.  Even a misdemeanor assault conviction could have a substantial impact on your future.  Depending on the allegation in your case, the State could charge your assault as a Class 1, 2, or 3 misdemeanor.  The penalties could include:

 

Class 1 Misdemeanor (Causes an injury, no matter how minor)

  • Up to 6 months in jail;
  • Up to $5,000 in fines and surcharges;
  • Up to 3 years probation;
  • Court ordered counseling;
  • Court ordered community service.

 

Class 2 Misdemeanor (touches with intent to injure, but no injury)

  • Up to 4 months in jail;
  • Up to $1,500 in fines and surcharges;
  • Up to 2 years probation;
  • Court ordered counseling;
  • Court ordered community service.

 

Class 3 Misdemeanor (places a person in reasonable apprehension of imminent injury)

  • Up to 1 month in jail;
  • Up to $1,000 in fines and surcharges;
  • Up to 1 year probation;
  • Court ordered counseling;
  • Court ordered community service.

 

Depending on the relationship between you and the alleged victim, your case could be filed as a “domestic violence” offense.  To be classified as “domestic violence”, the State would have to prove that you and the alleged victim are:

  • A spouse or former spouse;
  • A person who lives with you or who formerly lived with you;
  • A person who you currently have or have had a romantic or sexual relationship;
  • A person with whom you share a child;
  • A person who is pregnant with your child;
  • A person who is closely related to you by blood or by court order;
  • A child who lives with you or who formerly lives with you.

 

For more information on domestic violence see our Domestic Violence page

Have you been arrested? Do you need help avoiding jail time?